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Exped Scout Hammock Combi Item # EXPP3204
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$258.99
$258.99

Availability: In Stock!

Ships Tuesday.

Availability: In Stock!

Ships Tuesday.

The Exped Scout Hammock Combi includes a hammock, a rain tarp and a mosquito net. Sure to appeal to technical backpackers and recreational users alike, the Scout Hammock Combi hammock is lightweight, functional and easy to use.

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Description

Details

The Exped Scout Hammock Combi includes a traditional style hammock, a rain tarp and a mosquito net. Sure to appeal to technical backpackers and recreational users alike, the Scout Hammock Combi hammock is lightweight, functional and easy to use.

Each hammock is constructed of taffeta polyester fabric for years of reliable use, and has a mat sleeve in the double floor to house your sleeping pad (sold separately).

The rain tarp allows you to enjoy the outdoors even in wet conditions, while the mosquito net is designed to protect hammock users from pesky winged predators. The tapered shape ensures bug won’t get close enough to bite, while an integrated pocket holds essentials close at hand. Entry from below your hammock is quick and easy with an elastic cord seal. The dark color of the No-See-Um polyester netting on the Mosquito Net offers great visibility from inside, but doesn’t attract biting insects. Exterior loops offer simple attachment points for guylines, keeping the net taut during use.

The Exped Scout Hammock Combi hammock is available in grey, with a green tarp. Overall dimensions are 118" x 55" with an average packed weight of 61.4 ounce.

  • Traditional style hammock with mosquito net and tarp included
  • Taffetta polyester hammock fabric
  • Mat sleeve in double floor
  • Full bug protection
  • Easy zipper access
  • Versatile set-up options
  • Maximum weight of 330 lbs.
Specs

Specs

Recommended Use Recreational Use and Ultra-Lightweight Hiking and Backpacking
Warranty 5 Year
Type All-In-One Hammock and Suspension System
Other Includes Hammock, Mosquito Net, and Rain Tarp
Item Weight 61.4 oz
Dimensions 118" x 55"
Capacity 1
Reviews

1 Item(s)

All ya need in one sack & no exotic (or any) knots required

Likes: This is your ticket to backcountry shelter independent of ground surface conditions with no experience required other than to be able to find a pair of appropriately separated trees. It's all in one bag.
This will be the first of 2-ish reviews. This is a non-outdoor evaluation. It's winter, the only trees I have near the house are also near the road, so it's a basement setup for now. Pay attention to how the stuff comes outta the bag. It looks like a great example for deploying in the field: suspension, hammock, and tarp comes out in that order so you don't have to dump it out on the ground to sort out the ingredients.
No knots required! They say if ya can't tie a knot, tie a lot; but in this case, if ya can't tie a knot, you still have shelter. The tarp has many tie points from lines already attached to the tarp with hardware provided to loop the line and tighten it. Mesh pockets, located where the lines secure to the tarp, contain the lines to prevent a gob of lines from developing when packing it back up or keeping lines, not in use, outta the way. The pockets have enough room to allow for an accordion-fold of the line to make delivering the line to an attachment point or stake also avoid any spontaneous tangle-knots from developing.
Is the suspension pre-stretched? I was a bit paranoid setting this up in the basement worried that I would start too loose and bounce my butt off the floor or one my attachment points, a 3 person carry treadmill, would move. So I placed a weightlifting bench underneath to reduce the distance of a pratfall. Once the tension was set, repeated entries and exits didn't change the distance between the hammock bottom and that bench. Not an industry standard test, but enough to make me wonder if the suspension was deliberately set up to not relax over time.
The channels in the bug screen seams intended to contain a flexible stay (like a sapling branch) to expand the volume, without running a line to pull the sides out, is genius. For lack of tree branches in the basement, I used narrow hard plastic tubing left over from an install of an ice maker and it arches out real pretty like a tent frame. I looked into that feature because I was worried about repeated stresses I was putting on the zipper by sitting on the mesh and adjusted, initially, by placing the screen over my head when backing into it and thought that installing those ribs would make it easier to get in and avoid planting my butt on the bug net. The tubing will coil up to fit into the stuff sack too.
The pocket opening is plenty wide enough to navigate a large Therm-a-Rest NeoAir XTherm sleep pad.
I haven't slept in it yet but look forward to it. In street clothes I got warm quickly on the sleep pad. I will give the mesh a breeze test later using a fan that normally services the aforementioned treadmill. This testing and other prep items to support an AT section hike in April/May is on my blog at billcarlinofr.blogspot.com
I am so stoked about testing this outdoors in a couple weeks where the weather is better. It's going to be an over-packed test of gear options and hammock vs tent is one of those tests. I did not want to go in big on a hammock system but putting together something a la carte was getting expensive really quick so this is looking like a very good entry level, full-on hammock experience.
Depending on whether I am allowed to review the same item more than once, I will be back with field results.

Dislikes: Instructions are a bit thin as if intended for an end user that is probably not a tragically inexperienced newbie like me but this was compensated for by videos from Becky, Exped and other sources.

Reviewed by Bill C. - January 8, 2016